Tag Archive | learning

Business School Tips

Hey everyone!

It’s insane to think that in about one week we will be celebrating Thanksgiving and cheering for a Buckeye victory against Michigan. I cannot believe that the time is flying by so quickly!  And with each passing day, the other 1st years and I are learning how to truly navigate through our program successful.

 These may not be your most traditional takeaways, but there are sure to help you in the long run!

  • Bring lunch and snacks – The vending machine is delicious….but dangerous. It can be too easy to grab a candy bar when you are staying late to review finance or accounting, but be warned! The sugar crash later will only make your eyes heavy during class. I try to pack a lunch during my long days to stop any vending machine temptations. Packing also stops the trips to eat out for lunch . Trust me, you and your wallet will thank me later.

 

  • Rohr Cafe will become your best friend (and possibly Panera) – Just to build off the previous post, your two years in business school will be the years you consume the most coffee. It is the norm to run  and grab a shot of caffeine before classes, in-between classes, after classes, while studying, and a few other times during the day. To help watch the spending, I recommend brewing your own cup at home and limiting the number of coffee runs a week. And if you are one of the stronger souls that don’t drink coffee – enjoy watching the frantic dashes of your fellow students who need to the sweet taste of Starbucks.

 

  • Wear layers to class – Seriously. A wonderful 74 degrees in your ops. class to a freezing 64 in accounting (I know, I know. I am warm-blooded and like the temperature slightly warmer than other people). But if you don’t bring a sweater during the fall and spring months, you will be freezing in one class and sweating in another.

 

  • Reserve a room – If you are meeting with a few others to study for a test or work through practice problems, make sure you reserve a room!  Around midterm and finals week, they tend to fill up quickly. You need to have a total of three attendees, so form a study group and reserve a room to ensure a productive evening of hitting the books.

 

  • Use a calendar and update it often – It could be a Google Calendar, iCal, an agenda or a combination of the three! However, there are so many activities, meetings, networking events and more that you’ll go crazy if you don’t write things down. I check my Google Calendar daily(which in in sync to my tablet and iPod), to make sure I don’t miss anything. I combine that with my physical agenda to make sure I stay caught-up with my readings and assignments. Trust me, you don’t want to be that group member that shows up late to a meeting.

Have a great week! Talk to you guys soon.

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Things to (make sure I) know before I’m 30

We’ve all seen the Glamour article (well, at least a lot of the girls have read it).

It talks about boyfriends, bosses, dates, dumping, pride and purses – “30 Things Every Woman Should Have and Should Know by the Time She’s 30″. In was originally published in 1997 and still circulates around magazines and the web today! It was turned into a book featuring essays from famous woman (some a little famous, some a lot famous) that continues to see today.

Last month I saw an article tweeted about what you should know before you’re 25 and blogged about my thoughts. I am proud to say at the ripe ol’ age of 22, I am crossing things off that list!

I found this Huffington Post article a few weeks ago that talks about the Glamour list and wanted to share it on my blog. As a woman I couldn’t agree more… and this gives me some things to work towards in the next eight years.

Glamour’s “30 Things Every Woman Should Have and Should Know by the Time She’s 30” 

1. One old boyfriend you can imagine going back to and one who reminds you of how far you’ve come.

2. A decent piece of furniture not previously owned by anyone else in your family.

3. Something perfect to wear if the employer or man of your dreams wants to see you in an hour.

4. A purse, a suitcase, and an umbrella you’re not ashamed to be seen carrying.

5. A youth you’re content to move beyond.

6. A past juicy enough that you’re looking forward to retelling it in your old age.

7. The realization that you are actually going to have an old age — and some money set aside to help fund it.

8. An email address, a voice mailbox, and a bank account — all of which nobody has access to but you.

9. A résumé that is not even the slightest bit padded.

10. One friend who always makes you laugh and one who lets you cry.

11. A set of screwdrivers, a cordless drill, and a black lace bra.

12. Something ridiculously expensive that you bought for yourself, just because you deserve it.

13. The belief that you deserve it.

14. A skin-care regimen, an exercise routine, and a plan for dealing with those few other facets of life that don’t get better after 30.

15. A solid start on a satisfying career, a satisfying relationship, and all those other facets of life that do get better.
By 30, you should know …

1. How to fall in love without losing yourself.

2. How you feel about having kids.

3. How to quit a job, break up with a man, and confront a friend without ruining the friendship.

4. When to try harder and when to walk away.

5. How to kiss in a way that communicates perfectly what you would and wouldn’t like to happen next.

6. The names of the secretary of state, your great-grandmothers, and the best tailor in town.

7. How to live alone, even if you don’t like to.

8. Where to go — be it your best friend’s kitchen table or a yoga mat — when your soul needs soothing.

9. That you can’t change the length of your legs, the width of your hips, or the nature of your parents.

10. That your childhood may not have been perfect, but it’s over.

11. What you would and wouldn’t do for money or love.

12. That nobody gets away with smoking, drinking, doing drugs, or not flossing for very long.

13. Who you can trust, who you can’t, and why you shouldn’t take it personally.

14. Not to apologize for something that isn’t your fault.

15. Why they say life begins at 30

So I’ll admit, I’m working on the address that’s just mine, the decent piece of furniture not owned my mom and dad, the suitcase and the retirement fund. Well, actually my suitcase is just fine – but I think it would be cool to have a complete set (not a random piece given to my by the mercy of my parents). I would also like to know if the “ridiculously expensive” item I am to buy because I deserve it, needs to pass the dad approval test…because, if not, I think I deserve some more Burberry in my closet. Right? Ok, I’ll save my next splurge for a kick-butt power suit… perfect when I am conquering the business world.
And who are we fooling? My important mail still goes to my parents’ house. I don’t really know (yet) how to quit a job or ask for raise, and I apologize way too often for my own good. BUT this list shows me that I am maturing and finding my way.
I may not know how I feel about kids right now, but I don’t have to decide today, or tomorrow, or in one year. However, it is something that I will need to really start to contemplate in the next few years. I am figuring out my relationship with my family, friends and with my boyfriend. Even better, I am learning that I can do things alone. I ran the Capital City Half-Marathon by myself (and a few great supporters at mile 11 and the finish line) and I am get myself up, ready and to work/gym/friends’ houses on-time. Slowly learning what it is like to be a “grown-up”.It can be easy to want to call someone when life gets tough – and you’re allowed to ask for help. But, you need to know who is the right person to call and that no matter what, you could take care of a situation by yourself.
Here are five things I think should be added to the above list:
  1. If a car gets you from Point A to Point B – you’re lucky
  2. Not having fabulous weekend plans is ok (every now and then)
  3. It doesn’t matter the size of the clothes you’re wearing. Squeezing yourself into a size 0 doesn’t make you look skinny
  4. Brands are simply brands – there is more to life than comparing labels and designers. Keep clothes pressed and clean
  5. No matter what, life goes on

Great things to know before you turn 25

My friend tweeted an article a couple weeks ago and as soon as I saw the title, I immediately clicked over to read.

11 Things to Know at 25(ish) – published in Relevant magazine.

How could I not read this post? Shoot, I’ll be 23 in July….what if I only know a couple of these things? What if I don’t know ANY of them?!

I think this is the fastest I’ve ever read an article. While I don’t agree 100% with everything listed, this is a wonderful read for any college-grad.

(1) You have time to find to find a job you love &  (2) Get out of debt and stay out of debt. As a young college grad there is SO MUCH time to figure life out. I’ll be the first to admit, I have a hard time not stressing about, well, everything. Life, love, job, future, family, finances, friends, world….career, career, career. See? List goes on and on.

But when I take a step back and really look at the big picture, this is a time to be happy and LIVE. Things always fall into place. As for the second point – learn to budget and stay out of debt. I feel if I could give any college student financial advice it would stick strictly to budgeting. If you have time to go out on the weekends, eat out and shop, you have money to save. It can be a real slap in the face when you start paying rent and bills and debt can be the scariest monster of all.

(3) Don’t rush dating and marriage & (4) Give your best to friends and family. While there is nothing wrong with dating now (obvious of my relationship status) and getting married, this is the time to figure out your values and what you’re not willing to compromise. This is a great time to learn about yourself and what you really want in a relationship. Don’t think that marriage needs to happen right now, or tomorrow or even next week. Relationships take time to develop – and you need to be happy and settled personally before embarking on mature relationship.

This flows right into the next statement: give your best to friends and family…I’ll take it one step farther. Find out your true friends. Who is going to stand by you in a year? OK, scratch that, who will stand by you when you need them? Finding out who matters now, and showing them your thanks, is a great way to build relationships that will last.

The list by RELEVANT Magazine continues as such:

(5) Get some counseling
(6) Seek out a mentor
(7) Be part of a church
(8) Find a rhythm for spiritual disciplines
(9) Volunteer
(10) Feed yourself and the people you love
(11) Don’t get stuck

I believe the first four are extremely relevant (and important), but I do want to touch on the last seven.

(5,7,8) Find something to believe in. Prayer, faith, karma…SOMETHING. When the world travels 1,000 miles a minute and a young professional is finding his/her footing in the real world, sometimes religion/faith is the only thing that stay solid. It’s a great foundation to build life.
(6) FIND.A.MENTOR. That may need to jump to to number one. Find someone that you can turn to when you need help with a résumé, a job search or a situation at work. Make note: this is not a best friend, this is someone who will help you in your career. This is a person that cares for you – but will be honest when giving critiques and feedback.

(9, 10) We’re so blessed – share that. Go out and see the world and give back. I truly believe one person can make a difference and it is so easy to get involved with the community. As for cooking, well, it saves money and it’s healthier. I’m slowly falling in love with the kitchen and nothing makes me happier than inviting friends over for drinks and appetizers (that I made). Your wallet, and waistline, will thank you when you start cooking at home.

(11) Don’t get stuck 

“Don’t get stuck. Move, travel, take a class, take a risk. There is a season for wildness and a season for settledness, and this is neither. This season is about becoming. Don’t lose yourself at happy hour, but don’t lose yourself on the corporate ladder either. Stop every once in a while and go out to coffee or climb in bed with your journal.”

I love this excerpt from the article. Around the age of 25 you need  to know how to say no to a beer, but network at a happy hour. Know that you can change the world and can chase your dreams. Nothing is set in stone – and mistakes can be fixed.

Great way to end a wonderful article.

 

Grown up classes, please?

Mortgages, health insurance, 401(K)s, house payments, saving and retirement. All normal “adult” things in life. I’ve heard about them through out my high-school and college education, and now as a post-grad I would like to say one thing – I understand VERY little.

The secret is out! If you came up to me and started discussing benefit packages and 401(K)s I wouldn’t be able to contribute to the conversation.

Don’t get me wrong, I understand the core basics, but I don’t understand the topics to the full extent. Worse part, it’s starting to matter. I’m reaching the point in life where I am preparing to remove myself from my parents’ insurance and cell phone plan, begin paying for all of my car insurance and establish my credit.

I’ll be the first to admit it, I am extremely blessed with such incredible support from my parents. There allowed me to graduate college without debt and encouraged me to follow my dreams of participating in the Walt Disney World College Program. They pay for 1/2 my insurance and my cell phone (which, I would like to say I am the only 22-year-old without a smart phone) and help me with my finances. The only thing I paid for in college and now in Orlando is gas, groceries, 1/2 of my insurance, miscellaneous bills and fun spending money.

Great. So I am the girl trying to leave the nest with a college education, my polished resume (thanks to seminars and advisors), my life goals and determination.

Where do you learn the rest?! Where in life do you finally look in the mirror and tell yourself that it’s time to cut all the cords from your parents?

This summer I made the 1st step, I acquired my own credit card. Look out world, I’m working on obtaining that perfect three digit number. However, the process wasn’t easy. It reminded me of my freshman year of college: how to you obtain credit if you have no credit? The banks know when you’re on your on your parents’ plan that it isn’t really you paying the bills … and I have never bought a  car and have no loans. So after a meeting with my bank to explain that I did in fact have an income, and a quick review of both mine AND my parents’ relationships with the bank, I became the proud owner of my own credit card.

Again, trying to cut the ties with my parents and become a “grown up”, but needing their help all along the way.

So when am I old enough to know the secret handshake for the grown-up club?  I want to know about investing in the stock market, having a good lawyer, an appropriate APR and buying my first house. How do you learn these things? Is it by trial-and-error? Because in this economy, financial mistakes can become very costly. I’ve heard you should start saving for  retirement in your early 20s, but how exactly do you begin?

I know how to budget a small income on silly and some-what needed things – but how do you cross the bridge of obtaining a salaried job and budgeting for house-payments, cell phone bills, groceries and everything else?

In high-school I thought I knew it all and it college I thought I was learning it all – now barely dipping my toe into adult-hood, I know I still have so, so much more to learn.

Thanks for reading! I would love all  thoughts and opinions.