Tag Archive | tips

Business School Tips

Hey everyone!

It’s insane to think that in about one week we will be celebrating Thanksgiving and cheering for a Buckeye victory against Michigan. I cannot believe that the time is flying by so quickly!  And with each passing day, the other 1st years and I are learning how to truly navigate through our program successful.

 These may not be your most traditional takeaways, but there are sure to help you in the long run!

  • Bring lunch and snacks – The vending machine is delicious….but dangerous. It can be too easy to grab a candy bar when you are staying late to review finance or accounting, but be warned! The sugar crash later will only make your eyes heavy during class. I try to pack a lunch during my long days to stop any vending machine temptations. Packing also stops the trips to eat out for lunch . Trust me, you and your wallet will thank me later.

 

  • Rohr Cafe will become your best friend (and possibly Panera) – Just to build off the previous post, your two years in business school will be the years you consume the most coffee. It is the norm to run  and grab a shot of caffeine before classes, in-between classes, after classes, while studying, and a few other times during the day. To help watch the spending, I recommend brewing your own cup at home and limiting the number of coffee runs a week. And if you are one of the stronger souls that don’t drink coffee – enjoy watching the frantic dashes of your fellow students who need to the sweet taste of Starbucks.

 

  • Wear layers to class – Seriously. A wonderful 74 degrees in your ops. class to a freezing 64 in accounting (I know, I know. I am warm-blooded and like the temperature slightly warmer than other people). But if you don’t bring a sweater during the fall and spring months, you will be freezing in one class and sweating in another.

 

  • Reserve a room – If you are meeting with a few others to study for a test or work through practice problems, make sure you reserve a room!  Around midterm and finals week, they tend to fill up quickly. You need to have a total of three attendees, so form a study group and reserve a room to ensure a productive evening of hitting the books.

 

  • Use a calendar and update it often – It could be a Google Calendar, iCal, an agenda or a combination of the three! However, there are so many activities, meetings, networking events and more that you’ll go crazy if you don’t write things down. I check my Google Calendar daily(which in in sync to my tablet and iPod), to make sure I don’t miss anything. I combine that with my physical agenda to make sure I stay caught-up with my readings and assignments. Trust me, you don’t want to be that group member that shows up late to a meeting.

Have a great week! Talk to you guys soon.

Mind your manners

Quick dinner etiquette:

Napkins in the lap once everyone is seated.

Don’t touch your silverware until everyone at your table is served.

Drinks on the right, bread on the left.

Consume small, bite-size pieces.

Be aware of your silverware’s resting and finished position.

Never, ever, push away your plate and stack your dishes. 

 

Are the rules above ingrained in your mind and simply second nature? GOOD! Or, do you have no clue what proper etiquette is – and even less of a clue what a fork’s resting position is? PERFECT! Then this is the blog post you need to read!

For us Fisher Graduate students, the Etiquette Dinner this past Monday at The Blackwell  was a great way to brush-up, and learn, proper etiquette and table manners.

Hosted by At Ease Inc., our dinner was was a 4-course meal with soup, salad, entree, dessert and the trickiest food of all…BREAD.

Our wonderful host taught us the true intention of business meals (to enjoy the company of those around you), and how to properly eat soup, bread, pasta, meat and more. I had a basic understanding of proper etiquette (thanks, mom!), but it was so great to have a refresher course.

These simply tips are great to know how to act when out to lunch/dinner/drinks with coworkers, leaders or clients. In a professional job setting, you are always being observed and slurping your soup is not the way to impress your boss!

For more tips and tricks of etiquette, please check out the book, One Minute Manners by Ann Marie Sabath, president of At Ease, Inc.

This website also gives a great demonstration for the proper “resting” and “finished” position of silverware.

One of my favorite things about the Fisher MBA Program is the HUGE variety of activities offered. If you would told me four months ago I would be  having the time of my life in my program and learning how to eat temperamental pasta without embarrassing myself, I would have thought you were crazy! Fisher gives numerous opportunities to step away from classes and enjoy time with your fellow students, while still learning more about the business world. Where else can you get these fun experiences?

My favorite tip that I learned? When at a happy hour or networking event, keep your drink in your LEFT hand. This way when you are going to introduce yourself to someone, you are not awkwardly shifting your drink around and have a cold, wet hand

See you guys soon!

*images taken from google.com

Résumé – life on paper

I received the biggest complement the other day – a friend emailed and asked me to look over her résumé. Not a huge deal, but I’m always sending my résumé to my contacts it’s nice  to have someone ask for your feedback.

Resumes matter! And in my opinion, they need to be flexible works of “art”. This is a single piece of paper that represents YOU – those years of college, internships, co-ops, classes, projects, clubs, volunteering – everything one a piece of paper.

It can be hard to stand out from your competition, but if formatted correctly, can be accomplished. To have a great resume you need to spend quality time really deciding what is important and what needs to be highlight. Is this job looking for experience? Skills? Volunteering? Relevant course work?

There is no perfect example and every leader/contact you have review your résumé will focus on something different, but there are a few golden guidelines to follow. (Again, resume are flexible – which is these are only guidelines. My five tips are consistent with what I’ve experienced myself and advice I’ve received from teachers, employers and mentors.

One sheet. One. Not two, not one and a half, one. Yes, you have lots of experience and tons of things to say about each internship…but as a young professional stick to ONE PAGE. When we have a few years of work under our belt maybe we can grow to two pages, but for now it should stay at one.

Keep it clean, keep it precise. While we want to touch on everything we’ve ever done and make sure our possible employer knows how awesome we are – it’s easy to cram in unnecessary information. Leave some things to be discussed in the cover letter and in the interview. It’s a fine line between too much white space and not enough, but it’ll feel right when you find balance. Don’t make your potential employer dig through an ocean of type and words to find out the needed information. I also thing leaving off an objective helps. Use that space for something else!

No random “action words” or numbers. Again, a fine line, but one that needs to be considered. As college students and young grads we constantly hear to have strong words and as many numbers as possible, but don’t throw them in for fun. Employers know when it’s just BS and that’ll put your resume into the trash. Print out a draft and really see where you can highlight budgets, impact, number of people you led, ect.

Review and revise. Typos can lose you a job. This is one of that hardest things for me, which is why having several pairs of eyes read your résumé is fantastic. After staring at your computer screen for hours you may not catch that silly typo or frustrating auto-correct, but it doesn’t matter to an employer. A mistake is a mistake, and getting careless could be what puts your résumé at the bottom of the pile.

– Have more that one resume. It’s great to have a base then tailor your résumé for specific jobs. I love reading descriptions and really trying to figure out what each job wants. Are they looking for writing experience? Or perhaps social media? Maybe they want leadership examples from different clubs. Find out what a job is looking for and then show that company you are the perfect fit.

I hope my hints helped! Resume are always growing and changing – the more people you have look over them the better. Each revision makes you improve and makes your résumé stronger.

What are your tips for resumes?

Thanks for reading!