Tag Archive | kindness

Good Samaritans all around

“The first question which the priest and the Levite asked was:  ‘If I stop to help this man, what will happen to me?’  But… the good Samaritan reversed the question:  ‘If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him.'”  Martin Luther King, Jr.

While I’ve read the Bible Parable detailing the actions of a Samaritan to a stranger, and I’ve heard the MLK quote about the same good Samaritan , I’ve never really thought about what embodies a “good Samaritan.”

Now, don’t look at me like that! I try every day to do the right thing. A woman in the grocery store drops an item, I reach down to help her. See a family leave their baby’s zippy cup at Applebee’s, I’m running after them to give it back. Sitting the bus and see an older woman standing, offer her my seat. Walk out of a door first, hold it open for the people behind me. I simply never considered this being a good Samaritan, just behaving how my  parents taught me. Being polite and doing the right thing. (side note – thanks mom and dad!)

This weekend gave me reason to think about what makes a good Samaritan, and how people will drop everything and put themselves in *slight* danger to help a stranger.

Let me set the scene: on Friday night, my boyfriend, one of my best friends and I were chatting at Mouton, one of my new favorite places in the Short North. Mouton faces High Street and was decently packed. We had just arrived and placing our order when this horrific sound  from the street – and I whipped my head fast enough to see a woman fly through the air and smack down on the pavement. A bike, carrying two passengers, had crashed and both passengers were on the ground.

My friend and I didn’t even hesitate. I don’t even think we looked at each other. Before I could blink my phone was to my ear and I was looking around for cars as I dashed across High Street to the wreckage. The person driving the bike was on his feet and heading back to the woman, and I was yelling not to move her.

Now, I am certified as a lifeguard/first-aid/CPR – but I am out of my element when you pull me away from the pool. My friend is a med-student, but still years away from being a doctor. But we couldn’t just sit there and watch. There had been an accident – we had to help if possible. As I talked to the emergency personal on my cell phone, about 10 more people came to the scene. They helped keep the area safe as cars continued to pass, made sure the victim was covered with a light jacket, and a volunteer firefighter and a LPN worked together to put the woman into in-line stabilization while we waited for help.

To let everyone know – the woman, after a very scary few minutes, opened her eyes and was able to tell us her name. She said that she was in a lot of pain, but was able to move her feet.

Simple kindness made a difference. Those with the right training immediately appeared to lend their service. People cared, people stopped to help. Why? Well, why wouldn’t you help?

You hear so many negative stories these days – people not caring, world falling to pieces, crime and sadness growing.

Well, I don’t know about the world, but I can say that on a random Friday night in May, when a horrible situation occurred, good, average-joe people RAN to help. After the police/EMT arrived and everyone began to head back, I was so proud of everyone around me. Such a blessing to live in this town, city, state, country and world surrounded by good people, and those willing to help.

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please & thank you

Respect.

Not a complicated word – and not a complicated meaning. As children we learn about showing respect to our parents, friends, teachers, neighbors and ourselves. Growing up, my parents drilled it phrases of thank you, please and excuse me into my everyday vocabulary.

It becomes second nature…
when someone hands you an item, you say thank you.
when you want something, you say please.

When you interact with strangers you show them respect – the same you would show a friend.

However, that seems to be a harder task for more people than I realized. I’ve learned so much during my adventure as a Disney CP, and I truly believe this program taught me a lot about myself and working in a field that is strongly focused on customer service.

The best lesson its taught me? How important it is to be kind and respectful to everyone. 

It seems so easy to take out your frustration and anger on someone in the service industry. frustration and annoyance seem to be our first response when our desire are not met quickly and efficiently. Instead of talking to employees respectfully, some costumers address employees rudely.

Quickly doesn’t even seem to be the standard of service anymore – wants/needs/desires are expected to be met instantly.

I can say, without doubt, that my guest relation skills grew during my months at Disney, and I cannot wait to continue to increase my skills as I open the next chapter of my life.

And I will always treat others who are working at a grocery store, boutique, restaurant, coffee shop, theme park and business with common courtesy.

Even when things aren’t perfect…there will always be respect.

Kindness towards soldiers

This past spring break my best friend Kelsey and I traveled down to Miami fora week of sand, tanning and blue ocean. After a long, and in my humble opinion AWFUL, winter of single digit days and trudging through ice to get to class, the only thing we wanted to do was relax. No need for blatantly drunk parties, hand us a couple of cold Coronas and we were living the high life.

After a blissful seven days of paradise, Kelsey and I headed to the airport at 5 a.m. to make our 6:30 a.m. flight. Bleary-eyed and slightly annoyed that I was forced to settle for regular coffee because Starbucks was closed, I waited for the barista to fill the order of the people in front of me.

Ready for the magic?

Two soldiers were at the front of the line, but before they could reach into their pockets for money, the woman behind them stepped to the cashier and told the two American heroes she was paying for their things. She ignored their protests and said, “If you can protect our country, I can buy your coffee.” They other people in line clapped and then everyone went their separate ways.

The end. No drama, no proclamation of red or blue, democrat or republic,  just a simple act of kindness.

This past week I saw the same kindness in my hometown at a local gas station. As I waited in line to pre-pay, the woman in front of me laid a bill down in front of the attendant. She told him it was for the treats of  the three soldiers who were ordering sundaes. She paid for her items, left the bill on the counter, and walked out the door.

So I would like to dedicate this post to that random woman at Miami International Airport and the woman at UDF.  I am so proud to witness these two small events. Thank you both for inspiring me and showing how kindness continues in all methods. I can’t wait for my turn to pass it on.

Also, thank you for all of those who protect our country and guard our freedom. Coffees and ice-cream cannot compare to your actions – but thank you for everything.